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8.1: F1.01 Beginning & Example 3


Topic F. Using a Calculator

Objectives:

  1. Understand that different calculators require a somewhat different order of entering numbers and operations. Be able to use the correct order on YOUR calculator, and recognize which other calculators require a different order.
  2. Perform basic operations and square root
  3. Use exponents—not just squares and cubes
  4. Use the constant pi.
  5. Learn the difference between entering a negative number and the operation of subtraction.
  6. Learn to put in parentheses when needed.
  7. Read the output when it includes scientific notation.
  8. When and how much should you round the results?
  9. Checking your work with a calculator. (Estimation)

Discussion: Types of calculators

Generally speaking, the various brands of calculators all work in pretty similar ways, so the differences are in the type of calculator, not the brand.

We might think of four categories of calculators typically used by students:

  • Basic calculators. These add, subtract, multiply, divide, and a few other things. They cost $2 to $8.
  • Scientific calculators with a one-line display. These cost $5 to $15.
  • Scientific calculators with a two-line display. These cost $8 to $20.
  • Graphing calculators. These cost $40 to $150.

For these materials, the basic calculators don’t have enough capability and the graphing calculators have much more capability than needed and are more expensive than needed. Either of the two types of scientific calculators is acceptable. However, we enter various operations into them in different ways, so you’ll find it easier to pick one type and always use it. If you already have a scientific calculator, you can use it for this course. Most students find that they prefer a calculator with a two-line display. Those enable you to see what you entered and the result at the same time, which is not possible on the one-line-display calculators.

Example 1. Perform basic operations and square root.

Try all of these problems on your calculator to make sure that you understand what to enter to obtain the correct answer:

Solution: You know how to do all of these operations without a calculator. Do them and then make sure you can get the same answer with your calculator.

The order in which you enter the numbers and operations is different on different calculators. Practice with the calculator you will use in this course. Make a note in the margin here about anything you must remember in order to enter these into your calculator.

Example 2. Use exponents—not just squares and cubes.

  1. Find

    ParseError: EOF expected (click for details)

    Callstack:at (Courses/Lumen_Learning/Book:_Mathematics_for_the_Liberal_Arts_(Lumen)/08:_Topic_F:_Using_a_Calculator/08.1:_F1.01_Beginning_&_Example_3), /content/body/div[1]/div/div[2]/ol[2]/li[1]/img/@alt, line 1, column 4
  2. Find

    ParseError: EOF expected (click for details)

    Callstack:at (Courses/Lumen_Learning/Book:_Mathematics_for_the_Liberal_Arts_(Lumen)/08:_Topic_F:_Using_a_Calculator/08.1:_F1.01_Beginning_&_Example_3), /content/body/div[1]/div/div[2]/ol[2]/li[2]/img/@alt, line 1, column 4
  3. Find
  4. Find

Solution: Most scientific calculators have a square and a cube key (powers of 2 and 3.) But we will need to compute other powers. The exponent key on most calculators is denoted by one of these symbols:

ParseError: EOF expected (click for details)

Callstack:at (Courses/Lumen_Learning/Book:_Mathematics_for_the_Liberal_Arts_(Lumen)/08:_Topic_F:_Using_a_Calculator/08.1:_F1.01_Beginning_&_Example_3), /content/body/div[1]/div/div[2]/p[9]/img[1]/@alt, line 1, column 4

,

ParseError: EOF expected (click for details)

Callstack:at (Courses/Lumen_Learning/Book:_Mathematics_for_the_Liberal_Arts_(Lumen)/08:_Topic_F:_Using_a_Calculator/08.1:_F1.01_Beginning_&_Example_3), /content/body/div[1]/div/div[2]/p[9]/img[2]/@alt, line 1, column 4

, or ^.

  1. By hand (or in your head) find that .
    Find the exponent key on your calculator and make sure that you can use it correctly.
    Practice by evaluating

    ParseError: EOF expected (click for details)

    Callstack:at (Courses/Lumen_Learning/Book:_Mathematics_for_the_Liberal_Arts_(Lumen)/08:_Topic_F:_Using_a_Calculator/08.1:_F1.01_Beginning_&_Example_3), /content/body/div[1]/div/div[2]/ol[3]/li[1]/img[2]/@alt, line 1, column 4
    .
  2. Then use the same method to find

    ParseError: EOF expected (click for details)

    Callstack:at (Courses/Lumen_Learning/Book:_Mathematics_for_the_Liberal_Arts_(Lumen)/08:_Topic_F:_Using_a_Calculator/08.1:_F1.01_Beginning_&_Example_3), /content/body/div[1]/div/div[2]/ol[3]/li[2]/img/@alt, line 1, column 4
    . (That answer should be 2.157669.)
  3. You’ll need parentheses around the fraction in the exponent.
  4. Again, use parentheses around the fraction in the exponent.

Example 3. Use the constant .

  1. Find .
  2. b. Find
  3. c. Evaluate the area of a circle with radius 2: .

Solution:

  1. This is the Greek letter “pi” which denotes a number which is the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter and is approximately 3.14. It is used in many geometry formulas involving round objects. Often we need to use it to a greater accuracy than two decimal places. Most scientific calculators have a key for . Have you noticed that your scientific calculator has two different values for most keys? One, called the main value, is labeled on the key itself and the other, called the secondary value, is usually labeled right above it. To get that secondary value, you must press a specific other key on the calculator first. That is the “2nd” key or maybe “Shift” or “Inv”. Almost always it is the top left key of the calculator keyboard. On many calculators, the key is a secondary key value, so you’ll need to punch that top left key first. When you find that key, you’ll be able to see that . The different calculators have different numbers of decimal places.
  2. To find on your calculator, you must learn to use multiplication and the second key in the correct order. You can check your work, of course, by multiplying 2 times 3.14159… by hand to see if your calculator is giving you the correct answer.
  3. Notice how to enter these into your calculator so that the operations are done correctly. On one-line-display calculators, you may need to square the radius before multiplying by .

CC licensed content, Shared previously

  • Mathematics for Modeling. Authored by: Mary Parker and Hunter Ellinger. License: CC BY: Attribution

Customize the Start layout

OEMs can customize the Start layout by adding an OEM group of tiles to the end of the Start layout. The layout is customized by creating a LayoutModification.xml file. After following the instructions below to customize the Start layout with the LayoutModification.xml file, use Windows Configuration Designer to add the file to the device image. See Add the LayoutModification.xml file to the device for instructions.

The following image shows the default Start layout for Home and Pro SKUs (non-domain joined) with the placement of an example OEM group of tiles. (The down arrow tiles represent apps specified by Microsoft that are dynamically delivered – see below for more details.)


8.1: A.1- Starting.

  • Contributed by Alexey Shipunov
  • Associate Professor (Biology) at Minot State University

If you download your data file from Internet, go to the read.table() step. Otherwise, proceed as described.

Create the working directory on the disk (using only lowercase English letters, numbers and underscore symbols for the name) inside working directory, create the directory data . Copy into it the data file with *.txt extension and Tab delimiter into it (this file could be made in Excel or similar via Save as. ). Name file as bugs.txt .

Open R . Using setwd() command (with the full path and / slashes as argument), change working directory to the directory where bugs.txt is located.

. and press ENTER key (press it on the end of every command). Among other, this command should output the name of file, bugs.txt .

Now read the data file and create in R memory the object data which will be the working copy of the data file. Type:

If you use online approach, replace data with URL (see the foreword).

Attention! If anything looks wrong, note that it is not quite handy to change data from inside R . The more sensible approach is to change the initial text file (for example, in Excel) and then read.table() it from disk again.

Look on the data structure: how many characters (variables, columns), how many observations, what are names of characters and what is their type and order:

Please note that SEX and COLOR are represented with numbers whereas they are categorical variables.

Create new object which contains data only about females ( SEX is 0):

Now&mdashthe object containing data about big (more than 10 mm) males:

By the way, this command is easier not to type but create from the previous command (this way is preferable in R ). To repeat the previous command, press &ldquo(uparrow)&rdquo key on the keyboard.

&ldquo == &rdquo and &ldquo & &rdquo are logical statements &ldquoequal to&rdquo and &ldquoand&rdquo, respectively. They were used for data selection. Selection also requires square brackets, and if the data is tabular (like our data), there should be a comma inside square brackets which separates statements about rows from statements concerning columns.

Add new character (columns) to the data file: the relative weight of bug (the ratio between weight and length)&mdash WEIGHT.R :


8.1: F1.01 Beginning & Example 3

New International Version
The one who does what is sinful is of the devil, because the devil has been sinning from the beginning. The reason the Son of God appeared was to destroy the devil’s work.

New Living Translation
But when people keep on sinning, it shows that they belong to the devil, who has been sinning since the beginning. But the Son of God came to destroy the works of the devil.

English Standard Version
Whoever makes a practice of sinning is of the devil, for the devil has been sinning from the beginning. The reason the Son of God appeared was to destroy the works of the devil.

Berean Study Bible
The one who practices sin is of the devil, because the devil has been sinning from the very start. This is why the Son of God was revealed, to destroy the works of the devil.

Berean Literal Bible
The one practicing sin is of the devil, because the devil has been sinning from the beginning. For this reason the Son of God was revealed, so that He might destroy the works of the devil.

King James Bible
He that committeth sin is of the devil for the devil sinneth from the beginning. For this purpose the Son of God was manifested, that he might destroy the works of the devil.

New King James Version
He who sins is of the devil, for the devil has sinned from the beginning. For this purpose the Son of God was manifested, that He might destroy the works of the devil.

New American Standard Bible
the one who practices sin is of the devil for the devil has been sinning from the beginning. The Son of God appeared for this purpose, to destroy the works of the devil.

NASB 1995
the one who practices sin is of the devil for the devil has sinned from the beginning. The Son of God appeared for this purpose, to destroy the works of the devil.

NASB 1977
the one who practices sin is of the devil for the devil has sinned from the beginning. The Son of God appeared for this purpose, that He might destroy the works of the devil.

Amplified Bible
The one who practices sin [separating himself from God, and offending Him by acts of disobedience, indifference, or rebellion] is of the devil [and takes his inner character and moral values from him, not God] for the devil has sinned and violated God’s law from the beginning. The Son of God appeared for this purpose, to destroy the works of the devil.

Christian Standard Bible
The one who commits sin is of the devil, for the devil has sinned from the beginning. The Son of God was revealed for this purpose: to destroy the devil’s works.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
The one who commits sin is of the Devil, for the Devil has sinned from the beginning. The Son of God was revealed for this purpose: to destroy the Devil’s works.

American Standard Version
he that doeth sin is of the devil for the devil sinneth from the beginning. To this end was the Son of God manifested, that he might destroy the works of the devil.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
He who commits sin is from Satan, because Satan is a sinner from the beginning. The Son of God appeared for this reason: To destroy the works of Satan.

Contemporary English Version
Anyone who keeps on sinning belongs to the devil. He has sinned from the beginning, but the Son of God came to destroy all that he has done.

Douay-Rheims Bible
He that commmitteth sin is of the devil: for the devil sinneth from the beginning. For this purpose, the Son of God appeared, that he might destroy the works of the devil.

English Revised Version
he that doeth sin is of the devil for the devil sinneth from the beginning. To this end was the Son of God manifested, that he might destroy the works of the devil.

Good News Translation
Whoever continues to sin belongs to the Devil, because the Devil has sinned from the very beginning. The Son of God appeared for this very reason, to destroy what the Devil had done.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
The person who lives a sinful life belongs to the devil, because the devil has been committing sin since the beginning. The reason that the Son of God appeared was to destroy what the devil does.

International Standard Version
The person who practices sin belongs to the evil one, because the devil has been sinning from the beginning. The reason that the Son of God was revealed was to destroy what the devil has been doing.

Literal Standard Version
he who is doing sin, he is of the Devil, because the Devil sins from the beginning for this [reason] the Son of God appeared, that He may undo the works of the Devil

NET Bible
The one who practices sin is of the devil, because the devil has been sinning from the beginning. For this purpose the Son of God was revealed: to destroy the works of the devil.

New Heart English Bible
He who sins is of the devil, for the devil has been sinning from the beginning. To this end the Son of God was revealed, to destroy the works of the devil.

Weymouth New Testament
He who is habitually guilty of sin is a child of the Devil, because the Devil has been a sinner from the very beginning. The Son of God appeared for the purpose of undoing the work of the Devil.

World English Bible
He who sins is of the devil, for the devil has been sinning from the beginning. To this end the Son of God was revealed, that he might destroy the works of the devil.

Young's Literal Translation
he who is doing the sin, of the devil he is, because from the beginning the devil doth sin for this was the Son of God manifested, that he may break up the works of the devil

Matthew 4:3
The tempter came to Him and said, "If You are the Son of God, tell these stones to become bread."

Matthew 12:28
But if I drive out demons by the Spirit of God, then the kingdom of God has come upon you.

Matthew 13:38
The field is the world, and the good seed represents the sons of the kingdom. The weeds are the sons of the evil one,

John 8:44
You belong to your father, the devil, and you want to carry out his desires. He was a murderer from the beginning, refusing to uphold the truth, because there is no truth in him. When he lies, he speaks his native language, because he is a liar and the father of lies.

John 12:31
Now judgment is upon this world now the prince of this world will be cast out.

John 16:11
and in regard to judgment, because the prince of this world has been condemned.

1 Timothy 3:16
By common confession, the mystery of godliness is great: He appeared in the flesh, was vindicated by the Spirit, was seen by angels, was proclaimed among the nations, was believed in throughout the world, was taken up in glory.

He that commits sin is of the devil for the devil sins from the beginning. For this purpose the Son of God was manifested, that he might destroy the works of the devil.

1 John 3:10 In this the children of God are manifest, and the children of the devil: whosoever doeth not righteousness is not of God, neither he that loveth not his brother.

1 John 5:19 And we know that we are of God, and the whole world lieth in wickedness.

Matthew 13:38 The field is the world the good seed are the children of the kingdom but the tares are the children of the wicked one

2 Peter 2:4 For if God spared not the angels that sinned, but cast them down to hell, and delivered them into chains of darkness, to be reserved unto judgment

Jude 1:6 And the angels which kept not their first estate, but left their own habitation, he hath reserved in everlasting chains under darkness unto the judgment of the great day.

1 John 3:5 And ye know that he was manifested to take away our sins and in him is no sin.

Genesis 3:15 And I will put enmity between thee and the woman, and between thy seed and her seed it shall bruise thy head, and thou shalt bruise his heel.

Isaiah 27:1 In that day the LORD with his sore and great and strong sword shall punish leviathan the piercing serpent, even leviathan that crooked serpent and he shall slay the dragon that is in the sea.


Experienced programmers in any other language can pick up Python very quickly, and beginners find the clean syntax and indentation structure easy to learn. Whet your appetite with our Python 3 overview.

Python knows the usual control flow statements that other languages speak &mdash if , for , while and range &mdash with some of its own twists, of course. More control flow tools in Python 3

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Developmental counseling is categorized by the purpose of the counseling session. The three major categories of developmental counseling are:

Event counseling

Performance counseling

Professional growth counseling

EVENT COUNSELING

Event-oriented counseling involves a specific event or situation. It may precede events such as appearing before a promotion board or attending training. It can also follow events such as noteworthy duty performance, a problem with performance or mission accomplishment, or a personal issue. Click this link for examples of event-oriented counseling.

PERFORMANCE COUNSELING

During performance counseling, leaders conduct a review of a subordinate's duty performance. The leader and subordinate jointly establish performance objectives and standards for the next period. Rather than dwelling on the past, focus on the future: the subordinate's strengths, areas of improvement, and potential.

Performance counseling is required under the officer, NCO, and Army civilian evaluation reporting systems. The officer evaluation report (OER) (DA Form 67-9) process requires periodic performance counseling as part of the OER Support Form requirements. Mandatory, face-to-face performance counseling between the rater and the rated NCO is required under the noncommissioned officer evaluation reporting system. (See AR 623-3). Performance evaluation for civilian employees also includes both of these requirements.

Counseling at the beginning of and during the evaluation period ensures the subordinate's personal involvement in the evaluation process. Performance counseling communicates standards and is an opportunity for leaders to establish and clarify the expected values, attributes, and competencies. Army leaders ensure that performance objectives and standards are focused and tied to the organization's objectives and the individual's professional development. They should also echo the objectives on the leader's support form as a team member's performance contributes to mission accomplishment. The links at the top of this page provide access to numerous examples of Soldier and NCO performance counseling.

PROFESSIONAL GROWTH COUNSELING

Professional growth counseling includes planning for the accomplishment of individual and professional goals. During the counseling, leader and subordinate conduct a review to identify and discuss the subordinate's strengths and weaknesses and to create an individual development plan that builds upon those strengths and compensates for (or eliminates) weaknesses. Click this link for examples of professional growth counseling.


26 CFR § 1.461-5 - Recurring item exception.

(a) In general. Except as otherwise provided in paragraph (c) of this section, a taxpayer using an accrual method of accounting may adopt the recurring item exception described in paragraph (b) of this section as method of accounting for one or more types of recurring items incurred by the taxpayer. In the case of the “other payment liabilities” described in § 1.461-4(g)(7), the Commissioner may provide for the application of the recurring item exception by regulation, revenue procedure or revenue ruling.

(b) Requirements for use of the exception -

(1) General rule. Under the recurring item exception, a liability is treated as incurred for a taxable year if -

(i) As of the end of that taxable year, all events have occurred that establish the fact of the liability and the amount of the liability can be determined with reasonable accuracy

(ii) Economic performance with respect to the liability occurs on or before the earlier of -

(A) The date the taxpayer files a timely (including extensions) return for that taxable year or

(B) The 15th day of the 9th calendar month after the close of that taxable year

(iii) The liability is recurring in nature and

(A) The amount of the liability is not material or

(B) The accrual of the liability for that taxable year results in a better matching of the liability with the income to which it relates than would result from accruing the liability for the taxable year in which economic performance occurs.

(2) Amended returns. A taxpayer may file an amended return treating a liability as incurred under the recurring item exception for a taxable year if economic performance with respect to the liability occurs after the taxpayer files a return for that year, but within 8 1/2 months after the close of that year.

(3) Liabilities that are recurring in nature. A liability is recurring if it can generally be expected to be incurred from one taxable year to the next. However, a taxpayer may treat such a liability as recurring in nature even if it is not incurred by the taxpayer in each taxable year. In addition, a liability that has never previously been incurred by a taxpayer may be treated as recurring if it is reasonable to expect that the liability will be incurred on a recurring basis in the future.

(4) Materiality requirement. For purposes of this paragraph (b):

(i) In determining whether a liability is material, consideration shall be given to the amount of the liability in absolute terms and in relation to the amount of other items of income and expense attributable to the same activity.

(ii) A liability is material if it is material for financial statement purposes under generally acepted accounting principles.

(iii) A liability that is immaterial for financial statement purposes under generally accepted accounting principles may be material for purposes of this paragraph (b).

(i) In determining whether the matching requirement of paragraph (b)(1)(iv)(B) of this section is satisfied, generally accepted accounting principles are an important factor, but are not dispositive.

(ii) In the case of a liability described in paragraph (g)(3) (rebates and refunds), paragraph (g)(4) (awards, prizes, and jackpots), paragraph (g)(5) (insurance, warranty, and service contracts ), paragraph (g)(6) (taxes), or paragraph (h) (continuing fees under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982) of § 1.461-4, the matching requirement of paragraph (b)(1)(iv)(B) of this section shall be deemed satisfied.

(c) Types of liabilities not eligible for treatment under the recurring item exception. The recurring item exception does not apply to any liability of a taxpayer described in paragraph (e) (interest), paragraph (g)(2) (workers compensation, tort, breach of contract, and violation of law), or paragraph (g)(7) (other liabilities) of § 1.461-4. Moreover, the recurring item exception does not apply to any liability incurred by a tax shelter, as defined in section 461(i) and § 1.448-1T(b).

(d) Time and manner of adopting the recurring item exception -

(1) In general. The recurring item exception is a method of accounting that must be consistently applied with respect to a type of item, or for all items, from one taxable year to the next in order to clearly reflect income. A taxpayer is permitted to adopt the recurring item exception as part of its method of accounting for any type of item for the first taxable year in which that type of item is incurred. Except as otherwise provided, the rules of section 446(e) and § 1.446-1(e) apply to changes to or from the recurring item exception as a method of accounting. For taxable years ending before April 7, 1995, see Q&A-7 of § 1.461-7T (as it appears in 26 CFR part 1 revised April 1, 1995) for rules concerning the time and manner of adopting the recurring item exception for taxable years that include July 19, 1984. For purposes of this section, items are to be classified by type in a manner that results in classifications that are no less inclusive than the classifications of production costs provided in the full-absorption regulations of § 1.471-11(b) and(c), whether or not the taxpayer is required to maintain inventories.

(2) Change to the recurring item exception method for the first taxable year beginning after December 31, 1991 -

(i) In general. For the first taxable year beginning after December 31, 1991, a taxpayer is granted the consent of the Commissioner to change to the recurring item exception method of accounting. A taxpayer is also granted the consent of the Commissioner to expand or modify its use of the recurring item exception method for the first taxable year beginning after December 31, 1991. For each trade or business for which a taxpayer elects to use the recurring item exception method, the taxpayer must use the same method of change (cut-off or full-year change) it is using for that trade or business under § 1.461-4(m). For taxable year sending before April 7, 1995, see Q&A-11 of § 1.461-7T (as it appears in 26 CFR part 1 revised April 1, 1995) for an explanation of how amounts are taken into account under the cut-off method (except that, for purposes of this paragraph (d)(2), the change applies to all amounts otherwise incurred on or after the first day of the first taxable year beginning after December 31, 1991). For taxable years ending before April 7, 1995, see Q&A-6 of § 1.461-7T (as it appears in 26 CFR part 1 revised April 1, 1995) for an explanation of how amounts are taken into account under the full-year change method (except that the change in method occurs on the first day of the first taxable year beginning after December 31, 1991). For taxable years ending before April 7, 1995, the full-year change in method may result in a section 481(a) adjustment that must be taken into account in the manner described in Q&A-8 and Q&A-9 of § 1.461-7T (as it appears in 26 CFR part 1 revised April 1, 1995) (except that the taxable year of change is the first taxable year beginning after December 31, 1991).

(ii) Manner of changing to the recurring item exception method. For the first taxable year beginning after December 31, 1991, a taxpayer may change to the recurring item exception method by accounting for the item on its timely filed original return for such taxable year (including extensions). For taxable years ending before April 7, 1995, the automatic consent of the Commissioner is limited to those items accounted for under the recurring item exception method on the timely filed return, unless the taxpayer indicates a wider scope of change by filing the statement provided in Q&A-7(b)(2) of § 1.461-7T (as it appears in 26 CFR part 1 revised April 1, 1995).

(3) Retroactive change to the recurring item exception method. For the first taxable year beginning after December 31, 1989, or December 31, 1990, a taxpayer is granted consent of the Commissioner to change to the recurring item exception method of accounting, provided the taxpayer complies with paragraph (d)(2) of this section on either the original return for such year or on an amended return for such year filed on or before October 7, 1991. For this purpose the effective date is the first day of the first taxable year beginning after December 31, 1989, or the first day of the first taxable year beginning after December 31, 1990. A taxpayer is also granted the consent of the Commissioner to expand or modify its use of the recurring item exception method for the first taxable year beginning after December 31, 1989, December 31, 1990, or December 31, 1991.

(e) Examples. The following examples illustrate the principles of this section:

(ii) Under paragraph (g)(3) of § 1.461-4, economic performance with respect to $30,000 of the refund liability occurs on September 15, 1993. Assume the refund is deductible (or allowable as an adjustment to gross receipts or cost of goods sold) when incurred. If Y does not adopt the recurring item exception with respect to rebates and refunds, the $30,000 refund is incurred by Y for the 1993 taxable year. However, if Y has properly adopted the recurring item exception method of accounting under this section, and as of December 31, 1992, all events have occurred that determine the fact of the liability for the $30,000 refund, Y incurs that amount for the 1992 taxable year. Because economic performance (payment) with respect to the remaining $20,000 occurs after September 15, 1993 (more than 8 1/2 months after the end of 1992), that amount is not eligible for recurring item treatment under this section. Thus, the $20,000 amount is not incurred by Y until the 1993 taxable year.


Example: No Estimate Section

We want to construct a 95% confidence interval for (p) with a margin of error equal to 4%.

Because there is no estimate of the proportion given, we use ( ilde

=0.50) for a conservative estimate.

For a 95% confidence interval, (z^*=1.960)

This is the minimum sample size, therefore we should round up to 601. In order to construct a 95% confidence interval with a margin of error of 4%, we should obtain a sample of at least (n=601).


Emctl Commands

This section lists the emctl commands for the Enterprise Manager agent.

emctl start | stop | status subagent

Lists the status of agent.

emctl status agent -secure [-omsurl <http://<oms-hostname>:<oms-unsecure-port>/em/*>]

Lists the secure status of the agent and the port on which the agent is running in secure mode and also the OMS security status of the agent it points to. This command also gives the OMS secure port. Below is an example output:

emctl status agent scheduler

Lists all Running, Ready, and Scheduled Collection threads.

Lists the status of the jobs that are running at present on the agent. The following is an example output:

emctl status agent target <target name>,<target type>,<metric>

Lists the detailed status of the specified targets in the order of target name, target type. The following is an example of an oracle_database target. You can also provide a particular metric name in the emctl command to get the status of a particular metric of a target.

emctl status agent mcache <target name>,<target type>,<metric>

Lists the names of the metrics for which the values are present in the metric cache. See the following example for a simple host target:

The metrics listed above are the ones whose values are present in the metric cache.

Dumps the agent Thread CPU usage into a .trc file. This file contains the list of all the threads that are running at present and their CPU usage.Following is the sample output of emctl status agent cpu:

Gives the detailed status of the agent mutex contention for each thread. It gives the acquired, release, and wait time of mutexes for each thread.Following is a sample output:

emctl status agent memory

Used for debugging agent memory. You will need to set 𠇎nableMemoryTracing=TRUE” in emd.properties for memory profiling agent.

emctl status agent memclean

Clears the memory hash table. Note that by default, the memory tracing will not be enabled by the agent. So, if the memory tracing is not enabled, then emctl status agent memclean will not clear the hashtable. To enable memory tracing, you need to set enableMemoryTracing=true in emd.properties of the agent and then reload the agent.The following is a sample output:

Reloads the agent by reading the emd.properties and targets.xml files again. If you have changed any property in emd.properties file, for example, if you have changed the tracing level of collector in the emd.properties by changing tracelevel.collector=DEBUG (default will be WARN) then you need to reload the agent to make the agent takes this change into account. Note that the agent should be up and running for the reload to happen successfully.

emctl reload agent dynamicproperties [<Target_name>:<Target_Type>].

Recomputes the dynamic properties of a target and generates the dynamic properties for the target.Sample output for oracle_database is as follows:

Uploads xml files that are pending to upload to the OMS under the upload directory.

Pings the OMS to check if the agent is able to connect to the OMS. Agent will wait for the reverse ping from the OMS so that agent can say the pingOMS is successful.

emctl config agent <options>

Configures agent based on the options provided.

emctl config agent updateTZ

Updates the current timezone of the agent in emd.properties file.

Prints the current timezone of the agent.

emctl config agent credentials [<Target_name>[:<Target_Type>]]

Provides the option to change the credentials for a particular target. Through this, you can change the user name and password of the target. It will ask you when you run this command whether you want to change the user name or password. If you select yes, then you have to provide the new user name and password for the target which you want to configure. Then it will reload the agent.Sample output for oracle_database is as follows:

emctl config agent getSupportedTZ

Prints the supported timezones for the agent.

emctl config console <fileloc> [<EM loc>]

Allows you to configure the console based on the configuration entries that you have mentioned in the file <fileloc>.

<EM loc> is optional and can be used to operate on a different Oracle Home.

emctl config [agent] addtarget [-f|-force] <fileloc> [<EM loc>]

Allows you to configure agent.

<fileloc> contains a definition of target to add and where -f or -force allows to overwrite an existing target.If -f or -force is not specified, existing targets cannot be overwritten.

<EM loc> is optional and can be used to operate on a different Oracle Home.

emctl config [agent] addtargets [-f|-force] <fileloc> [<EM loc>]

Allows you to configure agent.

<fileloc> contains a definition of targets to add and -f or -force allows to overwrite existing targets.If -f or -force is not specified, existing targets cannot be overwritten.

<EM loc> is optional and can be used to operate on a different Oracle Home.

emctl config [agent] modifytarget <fileloc> [<EM loc>] [<EM State>] [-mergeProps]

Allows you to configure agent.

<fileloc> contains a definition of target to modify and -mergeProps is used when only target properties are to be updated.

<EM loc> is optional and can be used to operate on a different Oracle Home.

emctl config [agent] deletetarget <type> <name> [<EM loc>]

Allows you to delete target.

<type>,<name> specify target type and name to delete.

<EM loc> is optional and can be used to operate on a different Oracle Home.

emctl config [agent] listtargets [<EM loc>]

Lists all targets present in targets.xml.

<EM loc> is optional and can be used to operate on a different Oracle Home.

emctl config agent listtargetsfully [<EM loc1>] [<EM loc2>] .

Lists all targets present in targets.xml of the given Enterprise Manager location.

<EM loc> is optional and can be used to operate on a different Oracle Home.

emctl config [agent] listcentralagents [<EM loc>]

Lists the central agents this home is associated with.

The centralagent command does not apply in an agent-only home.

<EM loc> is optional and can be used to operate on a different Oracle Home.

emctl config [agent] addcentralagent <centralAgentHomePath> [<EM loc>]

Associates this home with a new central agent.

The centralagent command does not apply in an agent-only home.

<EM loc> is optional and can be used to operate on a different Oracle Home.

emctl config [agent] removecentralagent <centralAgentHomePath> [<EM loc>]

Removes the association of this home with a central agent.

The centralagent command does not apply in an agent-only home.

<EM loc> is optional and can be used to operate on a different Oracle Home.

emctl config [agent] upgradecentralagent <centralAgentHomePathOld> [<centralAgentHomePathNew>]

Upgrades all product homes being monitored by this central agent.

The centralagent command does not apply in an agent-only home.

emctl config [agent] setcentralagents <centralAgent1> [<centralAgent2> . ]

Sets the list of central agents this home is associated with.

The centralagent command does not apply in an agent-only home.

emctl config agent addTargetsToRepository <uploadFile> <update_on_dup (true | false)>

Adds targets to repository.

uploadFile contains definition for targetsupdate_on_dup decides whether updating duplicate targetsThis function is for central agent.

emctl config agent addAssociationsToRepository <uploadFile>

Adds associations to repository.

uploadFile contains definition(s) for association(s)This function is for central agent.

emctl config agent getLocalHost

Prints the local host where the agent is running.

emctl control agent runCollection <target_name>:<target_type> <metric_name>

Allows to manually run the collections for a particular metric of a target. Sample output is as follows:

Prints the current working directory you are in (pwd).

Resets the timezone of the agent. Stop the agent first and then run this command to change the current timezone to a different timezone. Then start the agent.

emctl resettzhost <hostname> <override_timezone>

Resets the timezone settings of the host where the agent is running.

Prints the version of the agent. Sample output is as follows:

emctl dumpstate agent <component> . . .

Generates the dumps for the agent. This command allow you to analyze the memory/cpu issues of the agent. Sample output is as follows:

Generates the sudo properties of the agent.

Clears the sudo properties.

Clears the state directory contents. The files that are located under $ORACLE_HOME/sysman/emd/state will be deleted if this command is run. The state files are the files which are ready for the agent to convert them into corresponding xml files.

Prints the agent home directory. The sample output is as follows:

emctl start blackout <Blackoutname> [-nodeLevel] [<Target_name>[:<Target_Type>]]. [-d <Duration>]

Starts blackout on a target.

<Target_name:Target_type> defaults to local node target if not specified.If -nodeLevel is specified after <Blackoutname>,the blackout will be applied to all targets and any target list that follows will be ignored.Duration is specified in [days] hh:mm

emctl stop blackout <Blackoutname>

Stops the blackout that was started on a particular target. Only those blackouts that are started by the emctl tool can be stopped using emctl. This command cannot stop the blackouts that are started using the Console or emcli.

emctl status blackout [<Target_name>[:<Target_Type>]].

Provides the status of the blackout of the target. The status includes the type of blackout, whether one time, repeating, or a scheduled blackout. This command also specifies whether the blackout has started or stopped.

emctl secure agent <registration password> [-passwd_file <abs file loc>]

Secures the agent against an OMS. The registration password must be provided.

Unsecures the agent. This will make the agent unsecure and the agent's port will be changed to http port.

Verifies the communication between the OMS and agent by sending pingOMS.

emctl deploy agent [-s <install-password>] [-o <omshostname:consoleSrvPort>] [-S] <deploy-dir> <deploy-hostname>:<port> <source-hostname>

'agent' creates and deploys only the agent.

[-s <password>]: Install password for securing agent.

[-S ]: Password will be provided in STDIN.

[-o <omshostname:consoleSrvPort>]: The OMS Hostname and console servlet port. Choose the unsecured port.

<deploy-dir> : Directory to create the shared (state-only) installation port.

<deploy-hostname:port> : Host name and port of the shared (state-only) installation. Choose unused port.

<source-hostname>: The host name of the source install. Typically the machine where EM is installed. This is searched and replaced in targets.xml by the host name provided in argument <deploy-hostname:port>.

<sid>: The instance of the remote database. Only specified when deploying "dbconsole".

emctl deploy dbconsole [-s <install-password>] <deploy-dir> <deploy-hostname>:<port> <source-hostname> <sid>

'dbconsole' creates and deploys both the agent and the dbconsole.

[-s <password>]: Install password for securing agent.

<deploy-dir> : Directory to create the shared (state-only) installation port.

<deploy-hostname:port> : Host name and port of the shared(state-only) installation. Choose unused port.

<source-hostname>: The host name of the source install. Typically the machine where EM is installed. This is searched and replaced in targets.xml by the host name provided in argument <deploy-hostname:port>.

<sid>: The instance of the remote database. Only specified when deploying "dbconsole".

Allows ilint support of agent.


Timezone Objects¶

The timezone class is a subclass of tzinfo , each instance of which represents a timezone defined by a fixed offset from UTC.

Objects of this class cannot be used to represent timezone information in the locations where different offsets are used in different days of the year or where historical changes have been made to civil time.

class datetime. timezone ( offset, name=None ) ¶

The offset argument must be specified as a timedelta object representing the difference between the local time and UTC. It must be strictly between -timedelta(hours=24) and timedelta(hours=24) , otherwise ValueError is raised.

The name argument is optional. If specified it must be a string that will be used as the value returned by the datetime.tzname() method.

Changed in version 3.7: The UTC offset is not restricted to a whole number of minutes.

Return the fixed value specified when the timezone instance is constructed.

The dt argument is ignored. The return value is a timedelta instance equal to the difference between the local time and UTC.

Changed in version 3.7: The UTC offset is not restricted to a whole number of minutes.

Return the fixed value specified when the timezone instance is constructed.

If name is not provided in the constructor, the name returned by tzname(dt) is generated from the value of the offset as follows. If offset is timedelta(0) , the name is “UTC”, otherwise it is a string in the format UTC±HH:MM , where ± is the sign of offset , HH and MM are two digits of offset.hours and offset.minutes respectively.

Changed in version 3.6: Name generated from offset=timedelta(0) is now plain ‘UTC’ , not 'UTC+00:00' .

Return dt + offset . The dt argument must be an aware datetime instance, with tzinfo set to self .

The UTC timezone, timezone(timedelta(0)) .